doom

The new Doom

Id Software, developers of the first Doom, released in 1993, created a new instalment in the series, also called Doom; it’s probably intended to be reboot. I loved the original Doom back in the day, which spawned the first-person shooter genre. In a few words: the new Doom is fantastic. It’s fast-paced, looks gorgeous, and plays great. What struck me most about the game is its near-perfect pace: in Doom, the lulls between the action give the game a heart-pounding sense of rhythm. Continue reading

dinosaur

The Ultimate Dinosaur

Spring is the time to clean out the house. I’ve emptied the attic (for the most part) and given away a few boxes’ worth of books. One of the books that I’ll never give away is The Ultimate Dinosaur, edited by Byron Preiss and Robert Silverberg, and published in 1992. I got this book as a present when I was still very young and very much into dinosaurs. It’s a curious book, and noteworthy.

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super

Super Tribes

A few weeks ago, I renewed my mobile phone contract, which came with an iPhone 6S. I used to have an iPhone 5S, but went with a Nokia Lumia 1520 back in 2014. I liked my Windows Phone, especially the quality of the photos it took, but the apps left a lot to be desired. Since I like to play games, I felt that it made sense to go back to Apple and revisit some of the games I once played on my iPhone 5S and to check out some of the newer games that have appeared on the platform since then.

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bond

Classic Bond

Recently, I managed to convince my girlfriend to watch all of the classic Bond movies, one after the other. We started with Dr No (1962) and then watched From Russia With Love (1963), Goldfinger (1964), Thunderball (1965), You Only Live Twice (1967), On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (1969), and finally Diamonds Are Forever (1971). They’re all notable in their own way, though in my opinion, the first four are probably the best and Diamonds is clearly the weakest entry in this series of seven films.

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primal

Far Cry Primal: closing thoughts

After a little more than a dozen blog posts, it’s time for my adventures in Far Cry Primal to come to a close. It has been an interesting and enjoyable journey that, aside from giving me the opportunity to play a really good game, also gave me the excuse I needed to delve back into books and articles on the Stone Age. As I said in my first post, there’s something instinctively appealing about the world of our hunter-gatherer ancestors.

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value

Far Cry Primal: added VALUE

This is a post about Far Cry Primal, but it isn’t part of my game diary series. There is a research group called VALUE, short for Videogames and Archaeology at Leiden UnivErsity (not a typo). And it so happened that they organized a meeting earlier today at the university to talk about Far Cry Primal: how it depicts the Stone Age (with a heavy emphasis on the Mesolithic), and what it says about the (possibly innate) human proclivity toward violence.

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